Catching Rain 2018-07-19T11:57:24+00:00

Catching Rain

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The Blue Thumb Guide to Raingardens »
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The Blue Thumb Guide to Raingardens »

In our cities and neighborhoods, stormwater runoff is often viewed as a problem or a nuisance. We collect it off our roofs into gutters and downspouts, or off our parking lots and roads in curb gutters and drains, and then put it in sewers to get out of our way as fast as possible. In the process it picks up pollutants from the roads and parking lots and then causes erosion and flooding downstream where the sewers dump into our streams.

Water, however, is the lifeblood of the planet and every living thing depends on it. With our weather getting increasingly erratic, summers hotter, and droughts more common, it makes more sense than ever to treat rainwater as a valuable resource. Each of us can collect and conserve water in our yards and easy starting points are raingardens and rain barrels. The more adventurous might then consider larger cisterns and rainwater harvesting systems.

Rain Gardens

Rain Gardens are gardens that are made to collect rainwater and soak it into the ground

Rain Gardens are gardens that are made to collect rainwater and soak it into the ground.

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Rain Barrels

Rain Barrels are well named since they are barrels made to collect rainwater

Rain Barrels are typically connected to roof downspouts to collect rainwater and save it for a dry day.

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Cisterns and Rainwater Harvesting

 Cisterns-are-larger-than-rain-barrels-these-tanks-are-used-to-collect-rainwater.

Cisterns are tanks used to collect rainwater, larger than rain barrels, and used for larger applications.

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